Future of Work

Most analysts agree that at least 60 percent of today’s jobs will be impacted by new technologies, such that workers will need new skills if they’re going to keep their jobs and work alongside advanced digital, automated, or intelligent tools. Other jobs are likely to be eliminated entirely. This means tens of millions of current U.S. workers are going to see their workplaces changed in the decades ahead.

Training today’s workers for tomorrow’s technologies

Nearly 9 in 10 voters believe the U.S. should provide skills retraining at no cost to any worker who loses their job due to automation. Yet the U.S. has virtually no comprehensive state or national policy framework to work with industry to help re-skill and retain current workers in their jobs.

Faced with these potentially dramatic shifts in labor market demand, and the potential for these shifts to worsen inequality, the U.S. needs a fundamental rethinking of our state and national policies around upskilling current workers and helping displaced workers transition to new opportunities.

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Skilled America Podcast Ep. 5 - The (Digital) Learning Divide

Host Rachel Unruh finds out how teachers and students are dealing with the challenge of transitioning to digital learning in response to Covid-19.

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Skills for an Inclusive Economic Recovery

A set of generation-defining investments in inclusive skills policy can contribute to addressing the disproportionate impact of the economic crisis on communities who have long suffered inequities.

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Featured Resources

Featured Blogs

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